AGES: 7 and up

Color Code

  • Practice logical thinking and pattern recognition skills
  • Enhance visual perception
  • Develop planning and problem solving
  • Foster concentration skills

Color Code is a fun puzzle game that exercises a person’s cognitive skills. Games and puzzles are integrated to the learning process to keep young children engaged and focus. They are fun activity to refresh and activate the mind. Color Code and similar games are designed to help children practice their logical thinking skills by presenting them with challenges that require to find a sequence. The goal of the game is to place the transparent slides in an order to replicate a series of compositions. They have to figure out which slides to use and the order of the slides to solve the puzzles. Practicing pattern recognition in every level.

Children who struggle to keep their attention can train their concentration skills by doing puzzle games. Color Codes and other puzzle games are an entertaining way to capture and keep one’s attention for long periods of time. Exercising the mind by creating different types of challenges the players keep their mind busy until they find the solutions to the puzzles. Helping the child to acclimate to work on problems and other types of exercises. Moreover, games puzzles are a good breaktime activity to reset the mind for in between schoolwork shifting the focus on a new problem can help them pick up the schoolwork with a new set of eyes.

Another cognitive skill that puzzle games help develop is visual perception skills. Games puzzle are intriguing and fun while they enhance visual discrimination and spatial insight. Color Code and similar games use images to replicate which players have to analyze the colors and shapes of the slides and arrange them in different order to solve the puzzle. Parents and educators can use the slides to help young children to learn colors and shapes helping them to recognize each slide before placing them in the stand. Instructing older children to work on the more difficult challenges to improve their visual perception.

Board games and puzzle are also great mind exercises for problem solving. Challenging children intelligence in a different way from the work assignments in their curriculums. Puzzle games such as Color Code are good way to develop creative problem solving. Also, it helps a child go through the steps of problem solving and planning. Putting into practice the skills they learned in class. Analyzing and strategizing how to move the pieces to complete the puzzle. Color Code and similar brain teasers are a constant challenge that keeps everyone entertained.

Jump In’

  • Practice problem solving
  • Develop logical thinking
  • Foster spatial insight
  • Build concentration skills

Brain teasers such as Jump In’ are fun way to challenge the mind in ways that reading or math are not able to. They are a good way to reset the brain when one is faced with more complex problems such as homework or real-life situations. Young children benefit from these types of games as they are developing their cognitive skills. Brain teasers exercise problem-solving skill which is essential for learning. The fun part of a brain teaser is that it keeps the child engaged in the puzzle until they are able to solve them. For example, brain teaser games such as Jump In’ integrate a story to the puzzle captivating children’s attention.

Jump In’ and similar sequential movement puzzles are meant to work on spatial insight. A key cognitive skill for spatial intelligence, children develop this skill to work on recognizing and deciphering visual data. It is the way one can solve puzzles such as mazes without using anything but the trained eye. Every Jump In’ puzzle is set up so three bunnies jump into rabbit holes using obstacles to get to the holes. The challenge is for the bunnies to jump over foxes and mushrooms in order to move. Helping players analyze each puzzle composition working spatial insight.

Another benefit of playing brain teasers is that they enhance concentration skills. Staying focus is crucial for learning or doing any type of activity. Children need to build their concentration skills to grasp everything taught in a classroom, for them to be able to read and work on school projects for long periods of time. Jump In’ and similar puzzles help the players’ concentration skills by challenging them to find the solution. The player is activity thinking about creative solutions and feeling self-accomplished once the brain teaser is solved.

Finally, brain teasers are meant to train the brain to think logically. Jump In’ and similar puzzle games help this cognitive skill by setting difficulty levels for each puzzle. Players plan and strategize for each challenge differently. The goal of these types of puzzles is to solve them efficiently in the shortest amount of time and shortest number of moves. Creating plans and thinking about moves ahead of time help develop logical thinking. Children get to strategize in their heads the moves just like in chest. Jump In’ and other sequential movement puzzles are an entertaining way to make the brain stronger and the person more confident about their abilities. While exercising children have a blast getting the bunnies in their homes every time.

The World Game

  • Learn geography
  • Build social skills
  • Enhance reading comprehension

Social Studies and geography classes can be dull and overwhelming with facts. Educators and parents use different teaching tools to make the lessons more dynamic. A good way to keep children engaged and learning about social studies is through games. The World Game is one of the many card games that teaches about geography, flags, countries’ capitals and other facts. Like many card games, The World Game comes with different games to play focusing on a subject such identify the country’s flag or locate the country on a map. Through hand-on learning children get to memorize these facts and apply it to world history and social studies. Having appreciation for the world and its citizens children get to learn about other cultures and traditions.

The World Game and other similar board games concise the information of countries in small sentences and phrases in its cards. However, the questions in the game require that the players exercise reading comprehension skills. Children have to study and read about the countries in geography lessons in order to test their knowledge. One of the card games requires the players to use a world map. Players must identify the location of the country using the information provided by the card to locate it on the map. The player who can find the country first wins the point. These types of games are a good practice for applying the information discussed and use it in real-life situations. Not only being a visual aid but also creating situations when knowing about geography is important.

Besides the learning factor of games like The World Game, they are good way for everyone come together and have fun. Building social skills, children get to learn how to interact with others by coping the behavior of the other players. Making the learning experience a competition motivates the players to prove their geography knowledge. The World Game and other similar games give leeway to talking and banter between each play which can be used to discuss more facts about a country or social study fact. Children are actively listening and retaining the information while they are entertained. The World Game and similar games represent importance of knowing about the world.

Animal Mastermind Towers

  • Develop logic and reasoning skills
  • Exercise problem solving
  • Boost memory
  • Active listening and communication skills

An entertaining game to play during study breaks or anytime is Animal Mastermind Towers. Part of the educational games, Animal Mastermind Tower and similar games help develop cognitive skills. Sometimes parents and educators like to integrate these games to the lessons to make learning more active. Aside from schoolwork, games are a good way for children to exercise their logic thinking and reasoning skills. Like brain teasers, Animal Mastermind Towers and other games alike are fun way to challenge their reasoning skills against others. Requiring the players to use deduction to solve the puzzles.

One of the benefits of including board games to lessons is that it aids a child’s communication skills. Games such as Animal Mastermind Towers requires players to practice public speaking as they interrogate each other to find their opponents code sequence. It is a good way to get children to talk. Also, board games are a good way to practice listening skills. While playing games such as Animal Mastermind Towers, children need to be keen to attaining the clues. Children practice active listening to focus on learning new information with each yes or no answer.

Another benefits of integrating board games as educational tools is that it helps boost a person’s memory. A child memory needs to be train to be able retain all the lessons given in class. Games are a fun way to exercise them since they only have to remember clues for a short period of time to win the game. Animal Mastermind Towers and similar board games require the players to remember in what order they placed their animals and at the same time trying to figure out the animal placing of their opponent. Trying to remember the opponent’s answers helps children expand their memory retention. Once they are done playing the game, they forget what they played, and they can focus on learning.

Animal Mastermind Towers and other similar games are fun way to exercise the mind. Every challenge, every puzzle needs creative problem-solving skills. Players can decide the level of difficulty of the puzzle to make the game more interesting. Testing the players problem solving skills. Children have fun to solve the animal order in the least amount of turns. Animal Mastermind Towers and other similar brain teasers are meant to help the players think outside the box in an entertaining way. Enjoying the challenge everyone is engaged and their minds are stimulated.

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